Research Facilities

Research Facilities

At our research facilties, high-qualified staff provides scientific and technical services for our scientists. They are a prerequisite for enabling ongoing efficiency and efficacy of our projects. Currently, the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen is housing the following centres. 

The light microscopy facility offers a variety of methods and equipment to retrieve all the visible information available from biological specimens. [more]
The Compute Cluster Facility is a centralized service unit, available to all departments and groups of the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen and the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory. [more]
The Electron Microscopy Facility offers a variety of modern techniques to address scientific questions in cellular and molecular biology on an ultrastructural level. [more]
Modern DNA sequencing technology has fundamentally changed the way how key questions in biology are being approached. The Genome Center Facility operates PacBio long-read and Illumina short-read sequencers and provides training and tools to enable existing and to develop novel sequencing-based applications. [more]
The mass spectrometry facility (MSF) is an infrastructure facility of the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen. The MSF is equipped with an ultra-high resolution QTOF mass spectrometer (Impact-II, Bruker) and a magnet resonance mass spectrometer with a dual ESI/MALDI ion source (scimaX, Bruker). [more]
The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Facility plays an important role in molecular structure determination, especially protein characterization, and conformational analysis. The instrumentation has primarily served the high-resolution research needs for investigators from the Departments of Protein Evolution and Integrative Evolutionary Biology. The services and equipment of the
NMR facility are also available to other Max Planck research groups and academic institutions, especially within the University of Tübingen. [more]
X-Ray Crystallography
Group leader: Dr. Marcus Hartmann

The primary goal of structural biology is a mechanistic understanding of biological macromolecules and of biological processes so that they can be described in the language of physics and chemistry. more
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